Are Incoming Pediatric Interns Ready to Obtain the Essential Components of an Informed Consent for Lumbar Puncture?

Emma V Omoruyi, Amalia Guardiola, Michelle S Barratt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: In 2013, the Association of American Medical Colleges created the “Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for Entering Residency” to more clearly define the set of activities that entering residents should be able to perform on day 1 of residency without direct supervision. EPA #11 is obtaining informed consent for tests and/or procedures. This EPA acknowledges that an entrustable learner should be able to document a complete consent among other components. The aim of this study is to explore whether incoming pediatric interns demonstrated the behaviors of an “entrustable learner” in the domain of documenting informed consent for a common pediatric procedure. Methods: All incoming interns in our program (2007–2017) completed a 6-station Objective Structured Clinical Examination during residency orientation. One of the scenarios involves obtaining parental consent for a lumbar puncture (LP). The researchers determined and agreed what components would be important for a complete and accurately documented consent. A retrospective review of the resident's written informed consents occurred looking for accuracy of documented components. Results: Of the 258 consents reviewed, 8 were complete and accurate. Incoming interns appear to be skilled when completing the basics of the informed consent form such as documenting names, obtaining signatures, and correctly identifying the procedure. However, detailing all the risks of the LP were areas for which they did not demonstrate proficiency. Conclusions: Documenting informed consent is not adequately demonstrated by our learners prior to the beginning of internship. We would recommend specific training before entrusting pediatric interns to obtain LP consent independently.

LanguageEnglish
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Spinal Puncture
Internship and Residency
Informed Consent
Pediatrics
Parental Consent
Consent Forms
American Medical Association
Names
Research Personnel

Keywords

  • entrustable, competency
  • graduate medical education
  • informed consent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Are Incoming Pediatric Interns Ready to Obtain the Essential Components of an Informed Consent for Lumbar Puncture? / Omoruyi, Emma V; Guardiola, Amalia; Barratt, Michelle S.

In: Academic Pediatrics, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{938146c858594c22a1d30b169d0b93cf,
title = "Are Incoming Pediatric Interns Ready to Obtain the Essential Components of an Informed Consent for Lumbar Puncture?",
abstract = "Objective: In 2013, the Association of American Medical Colleges created the “Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for Entering Residency” to more clearly define the set of activities that entering residents should be able to perform on day 1 of residency without direct supervision. EPA #11 is obtaining informed consent for tests and/or procedures. This EPA acknowledges that an entrustable learner should be able to document a complete consent among other components. The aim of this study is to explore whether incoming pediatric interns demonstrated the behaviors of an “entrustable learner” in the domain of documenting informed consent for a common pediatric procedure. Methods: All incoming interns in our program (2007–2017) completed a 6-station Objective Structured Clinical Examination during residency orientation. One of the scenarios involves obtaining parental consent for a lumbar puncture (LP). The researchers determined and agreed what components would be important for a complete and accurately documented consent. A retrospective review of the resident's written informed consents occurred looking for accuracy of documented components. Results: Of the 258 consents reviewed, 8 were complete and accurate. Incoming interns appear to be skilled when completing the basics of the informed consent form such as documenting names, obtaining signatures, and correctly identifying the procedure. However, detailing all the risks of the LP were areas for which they did not demonstrate proficiency. Conclusions: Documenting informed consent is not adequately demonstrated by our learners prior to the beginning of internship. We would recommend specific training before entrusting pediatric interns to obtain LP consent independently.",
keywords = "entrustable, competency, graduate medical education, informed consent",
author = "Omoruyi, {Emma V} and Amalia Guardiola and Barratt, {Michelle S}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.acap.2018.11.011",
language = "English",
journal = "Academic Pediatrics",
issn = "1876-2859",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are Incoming Pediatric Interns Ready to Obtain the Essential Components of an Informed Consent for Lumbar Puncture?

AU - Omoruyi, Emma V

AU - Guardiola, Amalia

AU - Barratt, Michelle S

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: In 2013, the Association of American Medical Colleges created the “Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for Entering Residency” to more clearly define the set of activities that entering residents should be able to perform on day 1 of residency without direct supervision. EPA #11 is obtaining informed consent for tests and/or procedures. This EPA acknowledges that an entrustable learner should be able to document a complete consent among other components. The aim of this study is to explore whether incoming pediatric interns demonstrated the behaviors of an “entrustable learner” in the domain of documenting informed consent for a common pediatric procedure. Methods: All incoming interns in our program (2007–2017) completed a 6-station Objective Structured Clinical Examination during residency orientation. One of the scenarios involves obtaining parental consent for a lumbar puncture (LP). The researchers determined and agreed what components would be important for a complete and accurately documented consent. A retrospective review of the resident's written informed consents occurred looking for accuracy of documented components. Results: Of the 258 consents reviewed, 8 were complete and accurate. Incoming interns appear to be skilled when completing the basics of the informed consent form such as documenting names, obtaining signatures, and correctly identifying the procedure. However, detailing all the risks of the LP were areas for which they did not demonstrate proficiency. Conclusions: Documenting informed consent is not adequately demonstrated by our learners prior to the beginning of internship. We would recommend specific training before entrusting pediatric interns to obtain LP consent independently.

AB - Objective: In 2013, the Association of American Medical Colleges created the “Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for Entering Residency” to more clearly define the set of activities that entering residents should be able to perform on day 1 of residency without direct supervision. EPA #11 is obtaining informed consent for tests and/or procedures. This EPA acknowledges that an entrustable learner should be able to document a complete consent among other components. The aim of this study is to explore whether incoming pediatric interns demonstrated the behaviors of an “entrustable learner” in the domain of documenting informed consent for a common pediatric procedure. Methods: All incoming interns in our program (2007–2017) completed a 6-station Objective Structured Clinical Examination during residency orientation. One of the scenarios involves obtaining parental consent for a lumbar puncture (LP). The researchers determined and agreed what components would be important for a complete and accurately documented consent. A retrospective review of the resident's written informed consents occurred looking for accuracy of documented components. Results: Of the 258 consents reviewed, 8 were complete and accurate. Incoming interns appear to be skilled when completing the basics of the informed consent form such as documenting names, obtaining signatures, and correctly identifying the procedure. However, detailing all the risks of the LP were areas for which they did not demonstrate proficiency. Conclusions: Documenting informed consent is not adequately demonstrated by our learners prior to the beginning of internship. We would recommend specific training before entrusting pediatric interns to obtain LP consent independently.

KW - entrustable, competency

KW - graduate medical education

KW - informed consent

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059411578&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85059411578&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.acap.2018.11.011

DO - 10.1016/j.acap.2018.11.011

M3 - Article

JO - Academic Pediatrics

T2 - Academic Pediatrics

JF - Academic Pediatrics

SN - 1876-2859

ER -