Perceived Parental and Peer Social Support Is Associated With Healthier Diets in Adolescents

Amier Haidar, Nalini Ranjit, Debra Saxton, Deanna M Hoelscher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Investigate associations between perceived parental/peer support for a healthy diet and adolescent dietary behaviors using data from the 2009–2011 School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) survey. Design: A secondary analysis of SPAN, a cross-sectional statewide study using a validated self-administered questionnaire, assessed obesity-related behaviors. Setting: Probability-based sample of Texas 8th- and 11th-grade students. Participants: A total of 6,716 8th- and 11th-grade students. Main Outcome Measures: Obtained by self-report and included sugary beverage consumption, fruit and vegetable intake, and SPAN healthy eating score. Analysis: Multiple logistic regression and linear regression were used to determine associations, controlling for demographic variables. Results: For every 1-point increase in parental support (range, 0–12), adolescents had 1.19 times higher odds of consuming ≥1 fruits or vegetables/d (P <.001) and 1.1 times lower odds of consuming ≥2 sugary beverages/d (P <.05), and had a SPAN healthy eating score (range, –100 to 100) that was 1.6 points higher (P <.001). For every 1-point increase in peer support, adolescents had 1.14 times higher odds of consuming ≥1 fruits and vegetables/d (P <.001) and a higher SPAN healthy eating score (P <.05). Conclusions and Implications: Parental/peer support was associated with healthier dietary behaviors. Future research could conduct pre-post intervention studies to determine whether an increase in parental/peer support is associated with positive changes in healthier eating.

LanguageEnglish
Pages23-31
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Social Support
Exercise
Vegetables
Fruit
Beverages
Students
Sampling Studies
Adolescent Behavior
Nutrition Surveys
Self Report
Linear Models
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Healthy Diet

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • dietary behaviors
  • parents
  • peers
  • perceived social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Perceived Parental and Peer Social Support Is Associated With Healthier Diets in Adolescents. / Haidar, Amier; Ranjit, Nalini; Saxton, Debra; Hoelscher, Deanna M.

In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 51, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 23-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haidar, Amier ; Ranjit, Nalini ; Saxton, Debra ; Hoelscher, Deanna M. / Perceived Parental and Peer Social Support Is Associated With Healthier Diets in Adolescents. In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. 2019 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 23-31.
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