Skeletal muscle lysosomal function via cathepsin activity measurement

Kristyn Gumpper, Matthew Sermersheim, Michael X Zhu, Pei Hui Lin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

Muscle wasting or cachexia is commonly associated with aging and many diseases such as cancer, infection, autoimmune disorders, and trauma. Decrease in muscle mass, or muscle atrophy, is often caused by dysfunction of protein proteolytic systems, such as lysosomes, which regulate protein turnover and homeostasis. Lysosomes contain many hydrolases and proteases and, thus, represent the major organelle that control protein turnover. Recently, lysosomes have emerged as a signaling hub to integrate cellular functions of nutrient sensing and metabolism, autophagy, phagocytosis, and endocytosis, which are all related to tissue homeostasis. In this chapter, we describe the protocol used to measure lysosomal proteinase (cathepsins) activity in the skeletal muscle. A better understanding of lysosomal function in muscle homeostasis is critical in developing new therapeutic approaches to prevent muscle wasting.

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages35-43
Number of pages9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1854
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Fingerprint

Cathepsins
Skeletal Muscle
Lysosomes
Muscles
Homeostasis
Peptide Hydrolases
Cachexia
Proteins
Muscular Atrophy
Autophagy
Hydrolases
Endocytosis
Phagocytosis
Organelles
Food
Wounds and Injuries
Infection
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Atrophy
  • Autophagy
  • Enzyme kinetics
  • Fluorimeter
  • Muscle acid lysates (MAL)
  • Protein degradation
  • Skeletal muscle function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Gumpper, K., Sermersheim, M., Zhu, M. X., & Lin, P. H. (2019). Skeletal muscle lysosomal function via cathepsin activity measurement. In Methods in Molecular Biology (pp. 35-43). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1854). Humana Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1007/7651_2017_64

Skeletal muscle lysosomal function via cathepsin activity measurement. / Gumpper, Kristyn; Sermersheim, Matthew; Zhu, Michael X; Lin, Pei Hui.

Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2019. p. 35-43 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1854).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Gumpper, K, Sermersheim, M, Zhu, MX & Lin, PH 2019, Skeletal muscle lysosomal function via cathepsin activity measurement. in Methods in Molecular Biology. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 1854, Humana Press Inc., pp. 35-43. https://doi.org/10.1007/7651_2017_64
Gumpper K, Sermersheim M, Zhu MX, Lin PH. Skeletal muscle lysosomal function via cathepsin activity measurement. In Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc. 2019. p. 35-43. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/7651_2017_64
Gumpper, Kristyn ; Sermersheim, Matthew ; Zhu, Michael X ; Lin, Pei Hui. / Skeletal muscle lysosomal function via cathepsin activity measurement. Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2019. pp. 35-43 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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