The impact of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on cognition in Bipolar Disorder: A review: Special Section on “Translational and Neuroscience Studies in Affective Disorders” Section Editor, Maria Nobile MD, PhD. This Section of JAD focuses on the relevance of translational and neuroscience studies in providing a better understanding of the neural basis of affective disorders. The main aim is to briefly summaries relevant research findings in clinical neuroscience with particular regards to specific innovative topics in mood and anxiety disorders

G. M. Mandolini, M. Lazzaretti, A. Pigoni, G. Delvecchio, Jair C Soares, P. Brambilla

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Background: Converging lines of evidence suggest that Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) may play a central role in the pathogenesis of Bipolar Disorder (BD), thus representing a valid biomarker of the disease. A common genetic variation in the BDNF gene, the Val66Met, is associated with reduced maturation and secretion of BDNF and therefore it has been related to specific mood, cognitive and neuroanatomical alterations in BD. However, so far, only a handful of studies have investigated the association between Val66Met polymorphism and cognitive functioning in BD. Methods: We performed a bibliographic search on PUBMED of all genetic studies investigating Val66Met modulation on cognitive performances in BD subjects. The inclusion criteria were met by nine studies, including a total amount of 897 BD subjects and 803 healthy controls. Results: From the analysis of the existing literature emerged that a) Val allele in BD adults, but not in BD adolescents, was associated with better performances in selective cognitive domains including executive functions, verbal learning and memory; b) Met allele may negatively modulate the association between childhood trauma and performances in memory, verbal ability and verbal fluency tasks; c) Met allele may also negatively regulate structural abnormalities in cognitive cerebral structures; d) Val/Met carriers showed greater improvements in cognitive functions compared to Val/Val and Met/Met carriers. Limitations: Few genetic studies exploring the impact of Val66Met on cognition in BD. Conclusions: Val66Met polymorphism likely modulates cognitive functions in BD patients with complex gene-environment interactions and through potential modulations of cerebral structures. Further and larger genetic studies are required in order to detect association between BDNF polymorphism, BDNF levels, brain abnormalities and cognition in BD.

LanguageEnglish
Pages552-558
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume243
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2019

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Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Neurosciences
Anxiety Disorders
Mood Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Cognition
Research
Alleles
Verbal Learning
Gene-Environment Interaction
Aptitude
Executive Function
Healthy Volunteers
Biomarkers

Keywords

  • BDNF
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Cognition
  • Single-nucleotide polymorphism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{ea2670f5597846a2a6d6f3f3d603e939,
title = "The impact of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on cognition in Bipolar Disorder: A review: Special Section on “Translational and Neuroscience Studies in Affective Disorders” Section Editor, Maria Nobile MD, PhD. This Section of JAD focuses on the relevance of translational and neuroscience studies in providing a better understanding of the neural basis of affective disorders. The main aim is to briefly summaries relevant research findings in clinical neuroscience with particular regards to specific innovative topics in mood and anxiety disorders",
abstract = "Background: Converging lines of evidence suggest that Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) may play a central role in the pathogenesis of Bipolar Disorder (BD), thus representing a valid biomarker of the disease. A common genetic variation in the BDNF gene, the Val66Met, is associated with reduced maturation and secretion of BDNF and therefore it has been related to specific mood, cognitive and neuroanatomical alterations in BD. However, so far, only a handful of studies have investigated the association between Val66Met polymorphism and cognitive functioning in BD. Methods: We performed a bibliographic search on PUBMED of all genetic studies investigating Val66Met modulation on cognitive performances in BD subjects. The inclusion criteria were met by nine studies, including a total amount of 897 BD subjects and 803 healthy controls. Results: From the analysis of the existing literature emerged that a) Val allele in BD adults, but not in BD adolescents, was associated with better performances in selective cognitive domains including executive functions, verbal learning and memory; b) Met allele may negatively modulate the association between childhood trauma and performances in memory, verbal ability and verbal fluency tasks; c) Met allele may also negatively regulate structural abnormalities in cognitive cerebral structures; d) Val/Met carriers showed greater improvements in cognitive functions compared to Val/Val and Met/Met carriers. Limitations: Few genetic studies exploring the impact of Val66Met on cognition in BD. Conclusions: Val66Met polymorphism likely modulates cognitive functions in BD patients with complex gene-environment interactions and through potential modulations of cerebral structures. Further and larger genetic studies are required in order to detect association between BDNF polymorphism, BDNF levels, brain abnormalities and cognition in BD.",
keywords = "BDNF, Bipolar Disorder, Cognition, Single-nucleotide polymorphism",
author = "Mandolini, {G. M.} and M. Lazzaretti and A. Pigoni and G. Delvecchio and Soares, {Jair C} and P. Brambilla",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
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doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2018.07.054",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on cognition in Bipolar Disorder

T2 - Journal of Affective Disorders

AU - Mandolini, G. M.

AU - Lazzaretti, M.

AU - Pigoni, A.

AU - Delvecchio, G.

AU - Soares, Jair C

AU - Brambilla, P.

PY - 2019/1/15

Y1 - 2019/1/15

N2 - Background: Converging lines of evidence suggest that Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) may play a central role in the pathogenesis of Bipolar Disorder (BD), thus representing a valid biomarker of the disease. A common genetic variation in the BDNF gene, the Val66Met, is associated with reduced maturation and secretion of BDNF and therefore it has been related to specific mood, cognitive and neuroanatomical alterations in BD. However, so far, only a handful of studies have investigated the association between Val66Met polymorphism and cognitive functioning in BD. Methods: We performed a bibliographic search on PUBMED of all genetic studies investigating Val66Met modulation on cognitive performances in BD subjects. The inclusion criteria were met by nine studies, including a total amount of 897 BD subjects and 803 healthy controls. Results: From the analysis of the existing literature emerged that a) Val allele in BD adults, but not in BD adolescents, was associated with better performances in selective cognitive domains including executive functions, verbal learning and memory; b) Met allele may negatively modulate the association between childhood trauma and performances in memory, verbal ability and verbal fluency tasks; c) Met allele may also negatively regulate structural abnormalities in cognitive cerebral structures; d) Val/Met carriers showed greater improvements in cognitive functions compared to Val/Val and Met/Met carriers. Limitations: Few genetic studies exploring the impact of Val66Met on cognition in BD. Conclusions: Val66Met polymorphism likely modulates cognitive functions in BD patients with complex gene-environment interactions and through potential modulations of cerebral structures. Further and larger genetic studies are required in order to detect association between BDNF polymorphism, BDNF levels, brain abnormalities and cognition in BD.

AB - Background: Converging lines of evidence suggest that Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) may play a central role in the pathogenesis of Bipolar Disorder (BD), thus representing a valid biomarker of the disease. A common genetic variation in the BDNF gene, the Val66Met, is associated with reduced maturation and secretion of BDNF and therefore it has been related to specific mood, cognitive and neuroanatomical alterations in BD. However, so far, only a handful of studies have investigated the association between Val66Met polymorphism and cognitive functioning in BD. Methods: We performed a bibliographic search on PUBMED of all genetic studies investigating Val66Met modulation on cognitive performances in BD subjects. The inclusion criteria were met by nine studies, including a total amount of 897 BD subjects and 803 healthy controls. Results: From the analysis of the existing literature emerged that a) Val allele in BD adults, but not in BD adolescents, was associated with better performances in selective cognitive domains including executive functions, verbal learning and memory; b) Met allele may negatively modulate the association between childhood trauma and performances in memory, verbal ability and verbal fluency tasks; c) Met allele may also negatively regulate structural abnormalities in cognitive cerebral structures; d) Val/Met carriers showed greater improvements in cognitive functions compared to Val/Val and Met/Met carriers. Limitations: Few genetic studies exploring the impact of Val66Met on cognition in BD. Conclusions: Val66Met polymorphism likely modulates cognitive functions in BD patients with complex gene-environment interactions and through potential modulations of cerebral structures. Further and larger genetic studies are required in order to detect association between BDNF polymorphism, BDNF levels, brain abnormalities and cognition in BD.

KW - BDNF

KW - Bipolar Disorder

KW - Cognition

KW - Single-nucleotide polymorphism

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2018.07.054

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2018.07.054

M3 - Review article

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